Timeline II
     1939 to 1969  

      1939

         High School, on Dale Ave., closed, reopened as Central Grammar School.     (18)

        Duncan's Point at the foot of Duncan St..  Building on the left with the smoking chimneys was the coal works, where coke was turned into gas.  The round structure above it was the storage container.  The large round buildings on the far right were also for gas storage.
(see below also, view from Vincent Cove)

       The photograph above is looking south down Vincent Cove from Bishop's Yard.

        Gill net reels, same design as they used in Michigan at the turn of the century.

        Shown here in the days when it was Gloucester's High School, it would be used for over 30 years as the Central Grammar School before being converted into elderly housing, and today, it is still going strong.

   1940

               Hotel Gloucester
 On the corner of Main Street and Water

        Looking down Rocky Neck with the  Rudder restaurant painted yellow behind the women walking.

         Sch. Yacht Blue Dolphin, Capt. Lawrence B. Dahlmer,  at Booth Fisheries wharf in E. Gloucester about 1940. She was built in 1926 by Shelburn Shipbuilding Corp, Shelburn, NS, Canada at 99'8" overall, 91t.displacement, 22'5"beam, 12' draft. She was taken for Naval service 6 April, 1942, out of service Jun.1945 at Boston, sold to Davit C. Nutt for oceanographic research in 1945. He also held 2nd. officer rank in the Merchant Marine and sailed for the Furness Lines between NY and Bermuda each winter.         by Bill Hubbard

        Canvas #165 Lawrence Dahlmer, in younger days, taking a sun shot on Granfather John A.'s Margaret D.

   1941

        Dory fishing replaced by draggers.      (18)

   1942

           The Louis T. under construction

 John Prince Story….
 "In March 1942 he took over the property across the creek from the Arthur Dana Story shipyards in the locality known as the former Alden Burnham property. His first order in this new location was a 70-foot gill netter valued at $35,000 for Capt. Peter O. Tysver of Gloucester which was launched November 15, 1942, and christened the Louis T."       (17)

        Arthur Dana Story in his yard.

   1942

         The Constitution being rebuilt at the Navy Yard in 1858.

         …"During the early part of the war, the Coast Guard had the stupendous task of photographing and fingerprinting upwards of 5,000 wharf workers and boat crews as a precaution against possible sabotage.  All sorts of precautions were taken by the Government which was absolutely necessary in time of war, but these regulations did in some instances work a hardship on the boats and crews."…… Another order from the Coast Guard stated that no enemy aliens, which included Italians, could go fishing for the duration of the war.  At that time, there were, in round figures, about 450 Italians fishing out of Gloucester.  Out of this number, there were at least 150 that did not have their final papers and were barred from fishing.  This necessitated running the Italian-American fishing boats with skeleton crews of seven or eight men.
   In April 1942, according to a Navy regulation, Gloucester became a closed port for the first time in its history.  No boats were allowed to leave for fishing trips before dawn or after sunset.  Thus, the port was closed to all water traffic during the dark hours of the night.  Navy patrol boats were on duty at the entrance of the harbor and also at the bay side of the Annisquam River to enforce this regulation."              (17)

      1943
          Some 23 of the largest fishing draggers and trawlers were sold or leased to the Navy          (18)

   1944

         from Gorton's history…"In 1944 Gorton's introduced the first frozen fish steak, a forerunner of what has become a company staple. Five years later, Gorton-Pew made national headlines when it made the first refrigerator trailer truck shipment of frozen fish across the continent, from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to San Francisco, California. The trip took eight days."

         Superior served in the US Navy from 1942-1944 during WW-II ferrying gasoline and supplies to weather stations on the Newfoundland and Greenland coasts. Here she is tied up across town still displaying her large bow numbers.

  1945

         
“The Gloucester fleet was down to about 150 vessels in 1933, but another 100 draggers had been added by the end of WWII as the fisheries thrived.

        Alexander's Fish Market in the corner
 of Beacon Marine Basin after the war (WWII)

        Duncan's Point

   1946

        St. Ann's Church steeple removed

         Grandfather's "Superior" back from her WWII duty.

   1947

        There were 2,000 fishermen and 280 fishing vessels when
 Larry O'Toole drew his Cape Ann map.            (18)

        The changing corner of Main and Pleasant streets.

   1948

        Gloucester Housing Authority incoporated. State law mandated "decent, safe, and sanitary House" for World War II veterans who could'nt find or afford it. (18)

   1949

        Barracks from Portsmith Navy Yard were dismantled and re-erected on Burnham's Field, the Oval, and Lincoln Ave. for Veterans housing.       (18)
 
 Martha Harvey, noted photographer, died. (18)

        The "West End"….looking down Main St. with Washington St. to the left.  Teddy Barcas' restaurant is on the ground floor of the old hotel on the left, below it can be seen as Shepherd's market in the late 1800's.

   1950

        Decline in redfish and other species resulted from over-fishing.     (18)

Wesley United Methodist Church on Prospect St. severely damaged by fire. (18)

Some 200 big draggers operated out of Gloucester (18)

        Canvas #142 Eastern Point Lighthouse and "Mother Ann"
Almost from the same vantage point that my father had taken the above photograph from.

        A.Piatt Andrew Bridge built across Annisquam River (18)

        Commemorative doors on bridge towers.

          Looking down Rocky Neck in the 50's

        Looking down on Good Harbor Beach.

        Exy and Irving Johnson aboard Yankee.

         I was 20 months old when my parents brought
me out to see the "Yankee" off.

   1951

        Landings of ocean perch (red fish) reached 177,000,000 lbs., nearly 3/4 of total landings. (18)

          Edna Fae and the Enterprise tied up in East Gloucester.

   1952

        Almost 1,700 people worked in  fish processing.      (18)

   1953

        Route 128 extended to Eastern Ave.      (18)

 First Baptist Church corner Middle and Pleasant Sts. and Cape Ann Historical Association Hardy- Parsons house recommended for removal.
       (18), GDT, Dec.10, 1953

        The arrow shows the beginning of the Gorton's property in East Gloucester

        "A" shows Gloucester Yacht Yard.
         "B" the East Gloucester Elementary School.

        The arrow shows Brown's Yacht Yard today, formerly Gloucester Yacht Yard

       Starting from the top:(A) the Atlantic Ocean, (B) East Gloucester, (C) South Channel, (D) State Fish Pier, (E) North Channel, and the intersection of Main and Prospect Sts. (F) before Urban Renewal.

   1954

        Some 221 million lbs. of fish landed. (18)

 
  Paint factory and Hydaway Bar on Duncan St., sail loft on Wharf St. and Marine Railway fires.  Fires on East Gloucester waterfront and lumber shed near Railroad Ave..           (18), GDT, Mar 25, 1991

   1955

        The Pilot Restaurant on Rock Neck, (above right), Sibley's house can be seen in the background to the right.

         Canvas #16 17 Rocky Neck Ave., the Sibley's house.

         Tom Morse,  coming home from being stationed in Panama during the Korean War purchased "Kelpie".  Here she is tied-hauled at Capt.Sibley's wharf.

           May 1, 1955 …. Capt. Irving Johnson's brigantine "Yankee" returns to Gloucester, on schedule, after an 18 month, 40,000 mile around the world cruise.

        Russian,Polish, and East German factory ships began fishing Georges Banks.                 (18), GDT, Nov.24, 1997         
  Blynman Bridge opened 7297 times. (18)
  Fire on fishing dragger spread to Slade-Gorton plant in East Gloucester in January. (18), GDT, Mar. 25, 1991

        When I was in grammar school, this magazine was used as a teaching tool to encourage reading.

        Gorton's new cold storage under construction.

   1956

        350th Anniversary of Champlain landing (18)

  Coast Guard abandoned Ten Pound Island Lighthouse and put up automated foghorn and small signal light.       (18), GDT, apr., 1990

   1957

        City took Davis Bros. property on Rogers St. for off street parking.
   (18), GDT May 10, 1957
   
  Bradford Building fire, two men die. (18)
  Good Harbor Beach Inn, Hawthorne's Casino, Old Home Hall, Eastern Point Hotel, and Gloucester Yacht Yard fires. (18) Oct.21, 1957  
 Gloucester Marine Railway and Duncan St. fires. (18) March 25,1991

        Check date…this is Gloucester Yacht Yard fire
 dated 1955.

       Canvas #97  Huntress Home and     
                                   Explorer II

        Huntress Home sale authorized. (18) Had been used by the City as a home for women.
 Prospect Ct. starts at just to the left of the photograph above, I grew up in the fourth house at the end.

        Looking up Prospect Ct. in 1910.

        Arrow points up Prospect Ct., to the right, Huntress Home sits on the corner of Prospect and Allen Sts..

   1958

        Ten Pound Island acquired by City from GSA.    (18),  GDT, Aug.17, 1979 Moorland and Oceanside Hotel fires.       (18), GDT, Dec.11, 1958

   1959

         Buildings in yellow, pretty much, removed in Urban Renewal I.
 (A) Building on the corner of Duncan and Roger St. saved.
 (B) Police Station and Fishermen's Institute torn down, turned into a parking lot.
 (C)  Building Center store saved, corner buildings removed for parking.
 (D)  Fitz Hugh Lane's Building saved.
 (E)  Some of these buildings saved and would become the Heritage Center.



 Almy, Bigelow and Washburn Department Store fire.      (18)

        Originaly Fitz Henry Lane's building, also known as the "Old Stone Jug"

        from Pavillion Mercato LLC - Birdseye - Gloucester


"Flash forward to 1959. Gorton's and Clarence Birdseye with his frozen fish sticks have pretty much put Frank Davis out of business, but things are still booming in Gloucester. They're bringing in more than 150 million pounds of food fish annually and it looks like things will only get better. However, in order to capitalize on the upswing, City Fathers realize that outmoded waterfront facilities need a major upgrade. The big question is, how will they get the money to do it?

Enter Urban Renewal, already a hot concept in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Revere, Somerville, and out as far as Lowell, Lawrence and Worcester. Don't forget, this is the Nineteen Fifties. People wear bow ties and crew cuts and definitely do not think outside the box. The whole Urban Renewal concept is based on the allure of that lovely Fifties romance with the brand, spanking New. And to get the New you have to destroy the old. Simple as that.

In fairness, the program was primarily aimed at eliminating substandard housing, and it did open up vistas and improve surface traffic. But our local planners saw Urban Renewal primarily as a tool to improve the waterfront. At the urging of HUD, the original Urban Renewal plan had been slated for a slice of “blighted” housing along the 128 extension and the B&M tracks. However, in the Fall of 1959 the City Council voted to drop the original plan and transfer their application for Urban Renewal to Gloucester's waterfront. The feds would provide ¾ of the funding. Gloucester's share was estimated at $850,000 but the Commonwealth of Massachusetts promised to pick up half of that amount. It looked like a great deal for Gloucester. So they got down to specifics.

Now it's December 1961, and a consultant named Dorn L. McGrath, of the Planning Services Group of Cambridge, pitches a bold concept to City Fathers. He proposes what he calls “a radical real estate redevelopment program.” He tells the assembled city councilors and other dignitaries that, “the waterfront is a naturally fascinating place, but we must keep foot traffic out of the marine railway area and other industries on the waterfront.”

The plan, which stretches from Vincent's Cove to the beginning of Harbor Cove, includes about 36 acres of waterfront property, and identifies 166 buildings, of which 96 are “substandard.” Sixty-five families will be displaced, but that's OK. The plan calls for each family to be given a $200 relocation payment. This typifies the kind of thinking that had been going on for decades in Gloucester, ultimately displacing hundreds of families in the downtown area.
The Fisheries Commission, Gortons, the Chamber of Commerce, Cape Ann Bank & Trust, the Planning Board, the Industrial Development Commission, the Housing Authority - Everybody likes it! Everybody, that is, except people like Margaret Mason, who lives down behind the Fitz Hugh (now Henry) Lane house. At this meeting she tells McGrath, “Where we live now is where we can afford. How are we going to be able to find someplace else for the same price?” McGrath says this is “an important question.”

It was a “radical real estate redevelopment program,” all right. In the end, among the demolished buildings were the Quincy Market warehouse, the Thomas Sail Loft the Gas Co. Building, Thurston's Garage, the Gloucester Hotel a multitude of bars, restaurants, retail establishments, dwellings and, of course, the old Frank E. Davis factory, which was built so solidly they had a hell of a time tearing it down. All gone forever – the teeming diversity, the organic fit of function and form that consultants now refer to as “authenticity,” supposedly much in demand among the tourist set… Gone."

   1960

          A hockey game on a frozen Smith Cove

         
CATNIP BILL

 by E.J. Lefavour


….."He was a kind of scruffy character who grew catnip, which he walked the streets of Gloucester selling, followed by a clowder of cats. Does anyone else remember the Catnip Man, called Catnip Bill? He was the subject of the children’s book ”Catnip Man” written in 1951 by Rockport author, Ruth Holberg.

According to Stephen P. Hall of Beverly, the Capnip Man’s real name was William Albert Joseph Patrick Swayne Luscomb."

        Peter's on the corner of Wonson St. and Rocky Neck Ave.   Years before it had been the "Last Stop"…the last stop on the trolley line, in an earlier time.

         1903: The "Last Stop" can be seen in the bottom right corner.                                  

   1961

        Snow drifts reached 14 feet.      (18)
  Urban Renewal project proposed to restore waterfront.    (18), GDT, Dec.21,1961 There were 61 properties listed for Urban Renewal appraisal.    (18),GDT, Dec.13, 1961 Bradford Building fire. (18), GDT, Feb.4,6 1961

        HUIPIE 1961         from "All My Girls" by Capt. Tom Morse

One of the cutest girls l ever laid eyes on was a sad sight the first time I saw her
Tucked away in a darkened nook at the Old Mother Hubbard Dog Food Company-Billy Hubbard, one of the owners of the dog biscuit factory on the corner of Prospect Street and Railroad Avenue, had bought the 75-year-old, 18-foot Plum stem boat years ago, he told me, always hoping to find time to put her back into shape. But now that his family business was about to dissolve, and the old wooden building was slated to be torn down, Billy said he had no choice but to sell her. We wheeled and dealed down to a mere Cnote, and I delivered her to my friend Bill Sibley‘s dock on Rocky Neck. She was named Huipie, a Dutch nick name given to my wife Bertha when she was a child. Now it was just a matter of finding the time and money to fix Huipie up.”
P16

        Cousin Bill Hubard's old timer…first boat I ever sailed on.

   1962

        About 110 million lbs. of fish were imported, 42 million lbs. of cooked and breaded fish items produced.       (18)
  Winslow Homer's painting "Breezing Up" reproduced on commemorative stamp.          (18) GDT, Dec.13, 1962

 







 
  East Gloucester wharf destroyed by fire, dragger damaged. (18) GDT, Apr.11,1962

   1963

        Master plan adopted in principle by City Council. (18) GDT, Feb.4, 1967
 
  Joseph E. Garland published "Lone Voyager" (18) GDT, Jul.28, 1988
 
 Between 1963 and 1968 Battery A was alerted or placed on stand-by alert seven times for possible civil disturbance duty in the Boston area. (18)

   1964

        Urban Renewal saved Fitz Hugh Lane House for preservation. (18_GDT, Oct.14, 1964

        by Peter Anastes
    My father behind the counter of Peter's on Rocky Neck, summer 1964, just before he sold the business and retired. Note the flowers, my mother's touch (from her garden), and the signature bow tie. Check also the prices of the sandwiches, especially lobster salad. (Photo by Barbara Erkkila, Gloucester Daily Times)

        The Big Wheel on Essex Ave. in West Gloucester.

   1965

         Captain Bill Sibley and Friends, in his winter workshop, having a good talk.
 left to right: Capt. Tom Morse, Bill Muise, Joe Garland, Capt. Sibley

           The shop back in the 20's

        Early 1900's as a gallery/ studio

        Capt.Tom Morse aboard "KELPIE"

        When Capt. Bill had the larger Peggybell II built he sold the original to
 Bill Muise. 

        Michel's  Cape Ann Diner on the corner of Elm and Main St.

        Canvas #45 Capt. Bill in his shop

        and now

        YMCA built on the site of Solomon's Temple      (18) GDT, Nov.30, 1965
  Thorwald Hotel fire.      (18)

   1966

        Urban Renewal began, central waterfront cleared for highway and industrial redevelopment.     (18),           GDT, June11,1966

        Harbor Park included in Urban Renewal Project. (18) GDT, Feb.8,1966

        Canavas #111    Burke's Bazaar

        Looking up Water St. towards Main St., Burke's Bazaar on the left, the Kazbar Lounge on the right.

        Burke's Bazaar at 11 Water St. before demolition.

        This is what the block looks like today, after Urban Renewal I.

        Former Giles Chapel on Rocky Neck sold to Christian Science Church.            (18)           GDT, Feb.8, 1966
 
 Joseph E. Garland published That Great Pattillo         (18) GDT, Jul.19, 1966

        The area before demolition.
 Below, after the block had been cleared.  The arrow points to the Fitz Hugh Lane building.

   1967 

        Gloucester Marine Railway transformed into million-dollar-a-year business (18)
       Schooner "Caviare" returned home to Gloucester.       (18)     GDT, Jul.22, 1967 

  1968

        Before the Urban Renewal II teardown.  The large structure in the photograph on the left was the old cold storage building.  Photo on the right is my TR3 driving down Main Street with the Texaco station in the upper  left

        First annual Great Schooner Race.       (18)     GDT,  Aug.12, 1972    

First United States factory fishing vessel built.      (18) GDT. Dec.19, 1968

  Harbor study undertaken.      (18)     GDT, Jun.22, 1868

  Gloucester to Nova Scotia ferry proposed.     (18)           Dec.19,1968

  Gorton's became subsidiary of General Mills.      (18)     GDT. Jan.30, 1977

  Schooner "Truant" found after huge sea and air search.     (18)     GDT, Aug.20,1968

         First annual Great Schooner Race.  (18)
 

   1969

         GDTDecember 31, 2008
Charles Olson today
20th-century Gloucester poet remains relevant into the 21st century
By Gail McCarthy

…"Olson summered in Gloucester as a child. His life would take him to many places, but in the end he settled here. His final masterpiece, "The Maximus Poems," would be based on Gloucester.
When Douglas Brinkley, an American author, noted history professor and national radio and television commentator, pulled together a panel in 1999 to choose the top 15 American poems of the century, "The Maximus Poems" came in at number 15, in a list that included works by poets such as T.S. Eliot and Robert Frost.
Sam Cornish, the current and first poet laureate of Boston, first introduced Olson to Cook when he was a student at Emerson College. But it wasn't until Cook moved to Gloucester that he learned so much more.
Cook, 34, an English teacher at Gloucester High School for a decade, wants to share with the community the continued relevance of Olson's ideas into the 21st century.
"A lot of the issues we are facing in Gloucester, about the Fort, the waterfront and ideas about education and the larger national issues, are right there in his poetry," said Cook. "By the end of the 1960s he was mad at Gloucester, for the urban renewal that was happening.""

        The Green Tavern was located on the first floor of the building that Howard Blacburn had built in 1900.

        "Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman, William A. Anders and James A. Lovell awarded Mariner's Medal for man's first lunar orbit."

 

        "Explosion at Quincy Market Cold Storage and Warehouse, Rowe Sq."
"Rowe Sq. was originally called Rose Bank." (18)

         Capt. Tom Morse has a new boat built in Deltaville, Virginia, and he named her the "Moby".

        Back To Index Page

GO

        Continue To Timeline
         1970 till Today

GO